Parenting, yurt life

Things messy people say

20 April, 2015

This goes out to all the parents constantly feeling the stab of lego beneath their socks, those who let their kids unroll the toilet paper because they’ve done the quick parental equation and have decided the mess the loo roll creates is worth the 20 minute’s peace, and to all the parents who have ever found half a long-lost apple languishing in the sofa cushions.. (To all the very tidy parents, like my very best friend from whose sparkly toilet I’d happily eat my lunch, I love you but you don’t need a shout out, Mr Muscle’s got your back.) 

Things messy people say:

1- I’m not naturally messy- but since becoming a mother…. 

2- Besides, creativity THRIVES in chaos!!

3- No really, studies.

4- And, y’know, it was EINSTEIN that said if a cluttered desk is sign of a cluttered mind, what is an EMPTY desk sign of? Ha!

5- *ding dong* Oh hello! Ah yes, we are just having a sort out…

6- Yes, sadly, a bomb DID hit.

7- A KID BOMB 

  boom shake shake shake the room

8- It’ s not so much a mess issue as a storage issue.

9- In fact, if we had good storage that would be a game changer, I tell you. 

10- Ah, look, here’s that bag of manky feathers the girls collected…. I’ll pop them somewhere safe for that time in the future when I’m gonna have to make an owl mask. 

11- I’m actually going to have a massive tidy in the morning.

12- *in the morning*  Ooh a beautiful day! LET’S PLAY!

13- I’ll just totally BLITZ the whole house once the kids are in bed.

14- *later* This book is genuinely BEGGING to be finished tonight.

15- Anyway, Einstein and all those geniuses were WELL messy. Proper filthy. So.

16- Doodidodidoo. I’ll just stick this in the bits n bobs drawer.  

17-I’m just not the kind of mum that wants to be tidying toys away from the kids all day, y know?

18- Arghhh. MORE LAUNDRY. WHERE DOES IT COME FROM? Where does it go? Where does it come from, Cotton Eye Joe? 

19- I’m sure our laundry basket has a spawn function. I’ll have to tell the girls to stop pushing that button. 

20- A clean house is sign of a wasted life. A clean house is sign of a wasted life. A clean house is sign of a wasted life. A clean house is sign of a wasted life.

21- I’ll just pop this random Thing on that shelf with all the other random Things. 

22- Gah! We have too many clothes! I’ll put them all in bags and take them to the charity shop!

23- After a cup of tea, I’ll do that. I shall. 

24- (Self-care, that’s called. Timely cups of tea and chocolate for mothers. The foundation of a stable family life.)

25- Ooh, but I can’t really give all this away because some of this stuff will be IDEAL for the dress up box. 

26- Or cowboy boots might make a comeback.

27- Or I might be invited to a Ukrainian Pop Stars from the Seventies fancy dress party and I will rue the day I got rid of this PERFECT shirt. 

28-  Lalala, I’ll just shove this enormous box full of Stuff into our storage, I mean spare, room.

29- And jam the door shut. 

30- And put this “ENTER AT YOUR OWN PERIL” sign on the door. 

31- And hope no one ever, ever looks in it. 

32- I mean, yes, I’m messy but not WEIRDLY so. I’m not exactly going to be on the news burrowing a tunnel out of my own mess! ha! Hahahaha! *panicked laugh*

33 – But seriously, as I always say, it might be a bit untidy, but it’s not dirty, like, unsafe

34 –  *googles* “basic level of hygiene”

35 – Right. So we won’t be getting a certificate.

36 – But the kids ARE alive, so hey! 

37- And while they are still with us it is positively futile to keep on top of their mess. 

38 – Although tomorrow I am absolutely definitely TRULY going to tidy. Tomorrow. 

No Poo

Shampoo Free Hair for 3 years – If you can’t eat it, don’t wash with it!

13 April, 2015

Oh, I had a lovely Saturday. I was at an environmental expo with my new workshop Happy Hair / Healthy Planet and basically spent the afternoon with a load of strangers feeling up my head, sticking their noses in my scalp and running their fingers through my locks. Oh yes! Surely if there is anything that can prove going Shampoo Free can give you healthy, shiny tresses it is getting up close and personal! I was pretty stoked that people actually went away and bought my ebook after rubbing my head like a genie – I have been selling stacks of them all weekend. YES!

Whilst cramming for my workshop I went even deeper into the chemicals present in our shampoo bottles and once again I was blown away by the fact that people wash in this unregulated carcinogenic concoction on a regular basis. If only people KNEW! And if only people realised they could stick those nasties in the bin, replace it with something from their kitchen and actually have BETTER, far, far, BETTER hair!

Well, I am on a mission now people>>>

Happy Hair/ Healthy Planet- on tour in the UK, NZ and USA!
I love writing, but I also love communicating face to face. Since finishing up my campaigning job with Oxfam, one of the things I have missed is the stream of workshops and presentations. I love meeting people and talking about stuff I am passionate about. So, why not start doing this with Happy Hair? My presentation involves looking inside the average shampoo bottle, all the alternatives, and the place of the No Poo movement within the wider, global environmental movement.

Happy Hair/ Healthy Planet will be on tour around NZ, the UK (in July, hoorah!) and San Francisco over the summer months.

Do you run an environmental centre or are you part of a group (such as W.I) that wants to host a workshop like this? I would love to work with you! Alternatively, please pass this on to any connections you have in those worlds! Get in touch through lulasticblog@gmail.comNoPoo hair
My Six Weekly Hair Cycle
I have been No-Poo for THREE years now- can you believe it? And I think I’ve just entered a new stage of lovely locks. (When I say “lovely” I mean “recently hacked at by  a massive pair of sewing scissors and unbrushed”)

I’ve begun doing a regular avocado or hot oil treatment and I think it has given my hair the gloss and softness that I realise I have been missing for a while. I realise I am in a sort of six weekly rhythm. I’ve come to believe that hair thrives when we mix it up and use a variety of ingredients.

Week 1 – Henna. Henna gives my hair a good old nourish and deep clean. I pack it on, stick a plastic bag on my head, followed by a scarf and then wander around for the afternoon acting as if I don’t look absolutely bonkers. I wash it out four hours later with cold water.

Ten days later….

1 tsp of baking soda in a cup of water, rinsed out with 1 tsp of ACV in a cup of water.

Ten days later….

I squish an avocado on my head and leave it for an hour. Then I rinse that out and slather an egg yolk on my head for 3 minutes- the only thing really effective at getting the avo oils out. Hair after this session is shiny-glorious-gloss-balls.

Ten days later….

A tsp of bentonite clay in a cup of water sloshed on and rinsed off, followed by a herb (lemonbalm or rosemary) rinse.

Ten days later…

We are back to the Henna and my six weekly rhythm pings on again.

NoPoo on Hippyshake TV
I thought I’d do a little Youtube about our family’s motto “If you can’t eat it, don’t wash with it!” but it sort of ended up as a bit of a farce when Juno started putting herbs in her ears. Anyway, here it is. You’ll probably die, crunching out to that wee lass and her determination with that lemonbalm.

PS I got this comment from a hairdresser about my ebook, how cool is that?! “I’m a hairdresser and I have tried everything to make my hair grow and be shiny and healthy, every product under the sun! I’m on holiday at the moment and my hair was duller and more brittle than ever! The only things from the book I had to hand was lemon juice and eggs, tried it and can’t believe how shiny and soft it feels from one wash and got rid of the grease build up! I am definitely going shampoo and conditioner free and will tell all my clients with the same problem about your book!”

Join the people discovering beautiful hair and lessening their environmental impact with help from Happy Hair – the definitive guide to giving up shampoo.

Parenting

Major ways I’m raising our second child differently to our first

7 April, 2015

We stayed up late the other night watching little videos we’d taken of our first daughter, Ramona, a few years ago. They were hidden deep in the caverns of our computer, buried under about 9 googleplex (the children’s current favourite number) of photos. We have so many photos that if we were to print them out I think we’d be able to stretch them to the moon and back, or we’d at least be able to bundle them into bricks and build ourselves a house.

Anyway, the films. Oh! How they made me BLUSH! I was absolutely criiiinging. It was so, SO obvious, in a way I hadn’t really processed, just how differently we are doing things with our second daughter, Juno. (There were also lots of really lovely ones – like this perfect example of that phantom breastfeeding thing babies do – once your nipple has left their mouth, they keep sucking. It is one of the loveliest things to look at in the world!)

I was trussing her about, waving her around, smooching her enormous cheeks, making her wave, making her stand, sitting her on my knee for Humpty Dumpty even though she was crying. I was having fun with her, almost like she was a prop or accessory to my–life-and-soul-of-the-party good time. And I wasn’t really treating her like a human at all.

It made me think of all the ways we have changed our parenting since having a second daughter. And the common theme to all of them is that we came to realise that even the tiniest babies are people – with unique feelings and important rights, with their own body to be respected and their own drive to be allowed to flourish.

It is so basic, but it took me such a long time to realise. I was a loving mum to Ramona, I ticked all the right attachment parenting boxes, but it wasn’t until she really showed me her bare face will, age 2, that I understood that she had had one all along. It was Ramona that paved the way for me to see Juno in the way that I did the second she was born. Juno turned up and her beautiful and glorious personhood was glowing out of her newborn folds of furry skin and baldness. I'm raising our second child differently to the first

Here are some examples of how differently this actually looks:

1- With Ramona we sat her up almost from the day she could hold her head up, we propped her and put her on her tummy and stood her on her big, rugby-player pins. Then I read about natural motor development and something clicked, so with Juno we tried to only ever put her in a position that she was able to get into by herself. So no tummy time, until she could roll, no sitting until she could pull herself to sitting. WHAT AN AMAZING JOURNEY!

The difference is that when they choose to do something, they are absolutely and utterly ready for it. It often means a different way round – crawling before sitting, for example- but they totally nail it. Juno crawled first and then sat a few days later and never, ever, ever tipped over.

This just fits in SO perfectly with the idea that children very often know what they are ready for, that they can be the lead on their own development and learning. It is awesome.

2- With Ramona I had quite strong senses of what she should and shouldn’t play with, where she should go, what she should be doing. Age six months for example, I had no worries about taking something straight out of her hands with no warning, or distracting her from something she was enjoying just so I could admire her cute face, or pulling her out of the way of something I didn’t want her going near. With Juno we hang back A LOT more. If we do need to take something away from her, mostly we simply ask for it, and she has tended to hand it over… but by and large we’ve just been able to let her go for it, and to REALLY let her get into it.

3- With Ramona, we had very little respect for the idea that her body was her own, we were convinced we were in charge of her body. We’d pick her up and plop her down and put a jumper on her and take a hat off her and wipe her nose and yank a nappy on. We have tried really hard to not do this with Juno. If ever we want to interact with Juno’s body, we ask permission first, even waiting for an invitation as a very small baby- such as the lift of a pelvis to change a nappy (Juno fully did this!) or extended, open arms from a 6 month old when we ask if we can pick her up.

4- We found Elimination Communication when Ramona was 3 months old and within a few days we saw it to be the way forward. With Juno it began on her very first day, when she was wriggling and distressed and Tim offered her the potty and she pooed and weed straight into it! Brilliant! However, with Juno we tried a lot harder to respect the fact that her body was her body, not insisting on her going if we felt she needed it (with Ramona we were like “C’mon, love, we can SEE you need to go!”) and we tried really hard not to interrupt bowl movements once they had begun, out of respect. We had no qualms about moving Ramona about mid-poo, to get her on the loo.I'm raising my second child differently to my first

I was introduced to a lot of this via Pennie Brownlee and Clare of the Pikler Collection – through the concept of Natural Gross Motor Development. It sounds a bit technical, but ooh look here is a simple introduction to exactly WHAT that is!!! *brand new vlog alert*

I was speaking to someone about all of this and they were like “WHAT! HOW CAN YOU NOT KNOW ALL OF THIS STUFF?! EVERY ONE IN THE WORLD KNOWS THIS!” And I was kinda like… well… we can’t know everything, all at once! I really didn’t know many people doing this in London. All the connecting, attachment stuff just blossomed naturally but the standing back and giving full respect to babies didn’t happen instinctively or me at all.

We can only parent with the knowledge we have to hand right now, don’t you think?

Of course, parenting IS the most world-changing job ever so therefore we should take it seriously and take our open minds and find stuff out and make conscious decisions.

But still, even the President of the Post-Graduate School of Parenting doesn’t know every one of the good and beautiful ways we can be with our children at the exact perfect time.

C.S Lewis, in the final Narnia book, says that we can only act according to the light revealed to us.

I love it, I love it for life and I love it for parenting. You can’t believe that and have many regrets, or have much judgment.

Have you changed your parenting much, from one child to another?

Keep in touch through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

Green things

Thrifty and lovely Borage Face Mask Vlog

28 March, 2015

Just a quick one to point you in the direction of my new favourite thing via two different medium (CRUMBS! I must really bladdy lave it.)

‘Cos I did a wee experiment (by this I mean “little” in Scottish, as opposed to experimenting with wee.. although, frankly, I have read good things about that) with BORAGE and it was super duper SCRUMPTIOUS.

It is an annual herb, a gristly, thistly plant with a stunning, dainty flower. It used to be cultivated in many a garden but these days it is more commonly grown accidently, as a weed, rampant along train tracks and wastelands.

It has traditionally been a staple soup ingredient in many European countries – that is kind of obvious from its name, I think. Borage Soup. Served up by warty caricatures in Roald Dahl’s stories…

I’m on a mission to rebrand this weedy herb- to add some glamour to it. The incredible properties of borage are fit for more than sweaty bowls of soup. (Woah, actually, don’t mean to be a downer about soup. Soup rocks. I just feel a bit dubious about borage soup. What can I say, I must be very phonetically sensitive.)

Read the rest here on Cosmo.Homemade Borage Face Mask - before and after
(There WAS a difference honest – this photo was taken twenty minutes apart … I recognise there are lighting difference, however – BLAME THE SUN harrrhahahaha)

And, I recorded this marvellous experiment for my exciting new Youtube Channel

Do come on over and subscri–hiiiiiibe!

Parenting

Do children need a daily bath? 8 reasons to stop washing so much

23 March, 2015

Ramona has a blue scalp at the moment. I mean, entirely blue. Bright, glowing ocean blue. It happened last week, when a friend and I looked out the window to see both of our children with rainbow heads – every hair shaft stiff with thick, vibrant paint they’d discovered in a drawer. It looked cool, really punky. I felt like I got an almost-complete polaroid of what she might be like as a teen.

Anyway, baking soda and honey managed to get almost all the paint out of her hair, just not her scalp.

It doesn’t really look cool anymore (there’s a reason coloured scalps have never taken off, turns out) – it just sort of looks feral. It’s like reptile skin, weirdly host to beautiful, blonde hair.

I guess, if we washed everyday, the blue scalp might have dissapeared by now. But the thing is, we really don’t wash every day… I’m developing a pretty strong stance against daily baths, actually.

There are so many reasons children don’t need to bathe daily. If a quick dunk in the bath is a chore in your family read on and let liberation soak you through…

8 reasons to stop giving your children a bath

Ramona must have a thing for blue hair (this is a wig, hehe, not the paint!)

1- Baths aren’t a necessary “should”.  

Family life is hindered, rather than helped, by having a list of Things You Must Do. Brushing hair, having a bath, eating five vegetables- chuck your list out the window and find yourself BLOOMING with liberation!! We have enough things we REALLY have to do as parents- so let’s let go of the things that have ended up on an arbitrary “should” list. As my friend and parenting guru, Sue, says “Parents need to stop shoulding on themselves!” Hold tightly to the truly important things, and watch everything else just falls naturally into a hierarchy.

2- Cleanliness is overrated.

A fascinating Washington Post article mentions the role a bit of dirtiness can play in our healthiness:  “overly clean living can be bad for our immune systems, which need certain microbes and gut bacteria to function properly and to keep us healthy from the more dangerous pathogens.” Having a good healthy, uninterrupted layer of skin-plus-extras can actually promote health. So many families report skin conditions such as eczema dissapearing once they switch to a weekly rather than daily bath. 

3- Baths, if not forced, can be therapeutic.

The result of making sure baths are only ever autonomously chosen is that children take great pleasure in them. For our four year old, the bath is the place she retreats to when she needs to find calm or have some space. She can spend an hour in their just floating and singing- once she even fell asleep. (We are lucky to live in a tiny winy shack that Tim built next to our yurt so the bath is only ever a couple of metres away… Somehow it still has a cocoon like feel.)

4- Pheronomes.

Furry gnomes (as Tim and I call them) are actually a really important part of our instinct and our understanding of people. There has been a bit of work done on the role of pheremones in sexuality, but they have a role in all part of our lives. There is growing evidence that suggests these chemicals we release impact mother-infant recognition and bonding. So definitely don’t wash your newborn!

5- Forcing our kids to do anything interrupts the development of their intrinsic motivation.

I see one of my roles as a parent to protect some of the precious things my child was born with in order to cultivate her happiness now and ever more! I see so many unhappy people who live their lives according to other people’s rules and wishes. How harmonious the world would be if we were all able to trust our internal desires, and to be self determined. I won’t (I should say, we TRY NOT TO) make our daughters do anything because I am preserving their internal motivation. They shall be the conductors of their own symphony! 

6- Baths can be an actual activity, y’know.

BATHS CAN BE SO MUCH FUN! They count as an official activity in our house. We put food colouring in, and glow sticks, and paints. (Consider these if for some reason you really must help your child to bathe more.)

7- Regular bathing is a modern, newfangled thing.

You know, back in the day they’d bathe ONCE A YEAR, in May. Then they used to get married in June because they were still clean. I’m not really a traditionalist, but for this point I am. Daily bathing is basically like SnapChat… in the history of the world, it’ll be barely a blink of an eye. (Although…. a year…. pheweeeee…. that is SOME TIME. Don’t go that extreme, eh, friends. Just meet in the middle with “Whenever your children fancy one”…)

8- Lastly, and most importantly, they are not “yours” to put in the bath!

Give your child an amazing gift: the awareness that his body is HIS alone. Show her, by never making her do something with her body, that no one can do something to her without her consent. Sometimes we let “the hygiene myth” get in the way,  we allow it  to interrupt this crucial, protecting message. Let your child yelling “I am the boss of my body!!!” fill you with hope and happiness.

8 reasons to stop giving your children daily baths

____

So, having a child with a glowing, colourful scalp, who looks so clearly like they need a good dunk in the bath, has, over this last week, in a funny sort of a way, made me become more sure, confident, that daily baths are one less SHOULD families need in their lives. And if people think Ramona is some kind of lizard child walking amongst us, so be it. We all need a little more magic in our lives, eh?!

PS- Any other reasons you can add? I’d love to hear if you’ve ditched any other parenting shoulds! 

Attachment parenting, Breastfeeding, Parenting

100 Names for Breastfeeding

18 March, 2015

100 Names for Breastmilk

I am so excited about this post, I am sitting in a cafe using their rubbish (but existent) wifi beaming my face off. It has been such a pleasure pulling together all the names toddler have for breastfeeding out there. They cover different languages, most of them have been generated by the children themselves and a few have been passed down through generations. Some of them clearly come from similar meanings and then some of them are just totally wild. Olivia and Donald? Finky and Dumper? Unbridled imagination – (don’t crush it!!)

A child’s word for breastmilk and the act of feeding is very often one of their first, and often introduced into the family dictionary. It must feel pretty special for a child to have their own word, for something that is so important to them, taken on and used. How perfect to feel so valued and trusted and a part of things. I feel like this list symbolises some of that trust, and the trust inherent in the intimate breastfeeding relationship.

We live in a society where it is common to hear people say “I don’t mind breastfeeding- but as soon as a child is old enough to ask for it, then they are TOO OLD.”

This is a rebel anthology- declaring this position to be an untruth. The moment babies are born they find ways to ask for it, and the moment they find WORDS to ask for it is the doorway to a whole new amazing experience. Societies distaste for breastfeeding older children is totally misplaced- in fact,  *breaking news*, massive, longitudinal study just published seem to show that the longer a child is breastfed, the more “successful” she is. Let’s celebrate the connection, the emotional and physical needs that are met in breastfeeding, by revelling in this joyous list. MILKY BOOBIES, THE OTHER ONE: ROCK ON BREASTFEEDING TALKERS! You yell your milk cry across the room, go right ahead- show the world that it is normal and right and magnificent to be a breastfeeding child. what toddlers call breastmilk!

Commonalities
There were one or two variations on “mummy milk” present but without a doubt the one that came up over and over and over (ten times!) was “Other side”. This is funny and astonishing! It just shows how much our children tune in to everything from a youngest age. Obviously, we don’t tend to say “Milkies” throughout a nursing session but we far more frequently offer, during the act, “Other side?!” Brilliant.

Different Languages
Susu – Samoan word for milk/ breast (I am interested in the fact that Susu could be milk or breast? This doesn’t seem common?)
Maka- from the word Malako in Russian.
Leche – Spainish for milk
Lait- French for milk and Bord is French for other side.
Dudth is how the Hindi word for milk sounds.
Nyonya is remembered as Swahili slang.
Teta – Catalonion, for milk.

Stories
Here are a few of the accompanying stories…
Olivia and Donald: Lindsey explains “When he was 4 he started calling my boobs Olivia and Donald. Not really sure why. He’s a bit off the wall that one. “Olivia” was sometimes called “Big fat booby” due to the size discrepancy. Poor Donald wasn’t very popular…”
Dips: Abigail says “Because I had to undo the clip on my bra”
Feeju: Marnie “As in “Feed You””
Nulky nulky noo: Hanabee, “Her own poem dedicated to the joys of extended/ never ending breastfeeing.”
Booble: Mo says “This caused confusion one Christmas when we were looking at the wreath on the next door neighbour’s house and I said “That ones made of baubles!”

Big thanks to our brilliant Facebook community and Twitter peeps who collaborated and shared their lovely stories.

ALSO EXCITING: I AM ON YOUTUBE! AND HERE IS ONE OF MY FIRST VIDEOS:
You definitely didn’t think you could hack watching five minutes of someone breastfeeding their toddler, did you? Well, let’s just see if you can! I wanted to try and capture the frantic fun and mayhem involved with breastfeeding older children. I hit record and got it in five minutes straight off. Pahahaha. Breaking for a book. Yelling. All the laughter. Animal sounds. Hands up nostrils. Chest pummelling. It’s all there. Come and find me and subscribe on Youtube as I hope to be giving it a good bash this year.

Hehe, all the fun, eh.

Thank you for taking part in this breastfeeding anthology. If you missed out it isn’t too late- add it in the comments 😀

PS – If you like this post share it all about – play a little part in normalising breastfeeding… !

Craftiness, Thrifty

DIY Jar Lids with Straws – for parties, or just your fun life

9 March, 2015

What on earth do you call these things? Huh? DIY Jars with Lids and Holes that you Drink Milkshake out of with Straws Container Things.DIY Jar Lids with Straws - chalkboard paint makes them a fun party accessory

All I know is that I saw them in the swanky gift shop for actual real money and I thought WHAT? I’ll Just push a screwdriver through my own jar lid, thanks very much! Trends, eh?

So I went home and did just that. Because I’m not going to lie to you, sometimes I do get over run with a deep need to MAKE IT ALL! (I was crying with laughter at this Shake It Off Parody– y’seen it?)

But then I thought I’d go Next Level and make some homemade chalkboard paint with my cool neon colours so that then you can write a message about your cocktail or smoothie, or just your initial so no one else slobbers on your mojito’s straw, and EEK LOOK HA! THEY ARE FU-HUNKKKKY. (Hey, I know people don’t really say funky that much but sometimes, when faced with your homemade neon pink straw and lid on your jar thing, it just pops out.)DIY Jar Lids with Straws - chalkboard paint makes them a fun party accessory

They’d make such a fun party extra, but they are also clearly brilliant for everyday with the kiddos… they stop the berry-smoothie-with-sneaky-kale-goodness slopping all over. Plus, when your life is just one big party, these accessories just seem to fit, y’know?

*massively tired face only parents of small children are really capable of* DIY Jar Lids with Straws - chalkboard paint makes them a fun party accessory

HOW TO:

Take a selection of jars and lids – those posh jam ones are nice to look at
Choose a drill bit the same size as your straws
Put your lid on a block of old wood and make a hole
Either leave them gold/ plaid or paint them with homemade chalkboard paint
(I actually didn’t have tile grout so used a spoon of plaster of paris and it works just as well.)
You will need two coats and you need to wait a day for it to be completely set.
Hold a milkshake party.DIY Jar Lids with Straws - chalkboard paint makes them a fun party accessory

Super easy to make, and a fun quick DIY you can bust out when you have the Make It All itch. Those paper straws are a bit of a have though- they go soggy after a while in the drink. Because WHO MAKES STRAWS OUT OF PAPER?! So just use your usual, ideally re-usable straws, but doll them up with a swatch of washi tape.

Lucy, singing loudly, and proudly handing out milkshakes, and also sort of trying to pop and lock at the same time: My milkshakes bring all the kids to the yard! *song fades as the realisation that its probably a bit inappropriate dawns*

Parenting, unschooling, yurt life

BIGGEST.NEWS.EVER.

26 February, 2015

I was making dinner yesterday and Ramona came in and was like “What you up to Mum?” and I said “Making a pie” and she took a good look inside my bowl and went “Worst. Pie. Ever.”

So… we do sort of, obviously, overuse that “Ever” thing rather a lot. But, truly, this is the

BIGGEST.NEWS.EVER.

You know how we moved to New Zealand for this sort of wild and free and outdoorsy life? And then we kept looking and looking for a bit of land to put our roots down? And then couldn’t find anywhere and it felt like things just weren’t really going to plan?

 Well, meanwhile, we were living in our yurt on an organic farm and learning an awful amount about farming and living sustainably, and how not to dye the chickens bright pink, and also making firm friends with the other families that live here. One of the families has a brood of children, and they unschool too, and we share many other values, and they have also been looking for a forever home. About halfway through last year we realised that we could, and should, do all of this together. 

 And then, exactly one year to the day that Tim and I moved here we looked at this piece of land on a river, in one of the North Island’s most spectacular spots, the Karangahake Gorge.



The local water feature

 And we were like; Woah. This is the one! It was ticking all the boxes we’d given up on – having a river to swim in, lots of forest, lots of flat, affordable. It is surrounded by Conservation Land, and a swing bridge from the corner of the property takes you over the river into some forest and small mountain ranges hundreds of miles big.

It's hard to capture - but here is a snap

It’s hard to capture – but here is a snap

So we bought it! Halfsies, with our friends. And today it goes unconditional! And we move there in the Spring! 

 It is funny though, this community living thing. It is like being heavily pregnant, when everyone wants to tell you their horrible – death defying birth stories, with all the gore and fears. And you are all “You are telling me this because ….. ?????” 

 When people hear we are going to be sharing this Dingly Dell they tell me about their best friends who bought together and then one of them chopped the other’s ear off, or that community that internally combusted due to communal mouldy potatoes. 

 I’m absolutely not denying it is hard, sharing life like this. We know so, so many people dream of it and it doesn’t work out. We realise it could well not last forever. But we are really committed to the idea, to bringing our children up in a tribe, to working together to live as sustainable life as possible, so we are going to really try and live this dream.

 (And at least we’ll never look back and wish we’d been more bold.)

 So YIKES AND YAY!!!!! We are planning now, and dreaming, and THIS SHIZZELMCNIZZEL JUST GOT REAL!

 (PS, I haven’t forgotten about the Social Justice and Parenting Series thingy it is just quite heavy and so I’ll be taking more frivolous breaks in between them…) 

Attachment parenting, Breastfeeding, Parenting

A Breastfeeding Poem (also- I need your help!)

19 February, 2015

Milk-cry

“BOOBOO!” You shout
Less crass than “BAPS!”
– the milk-cry of your sister.

Entangled elsewhere,
Hands dirty, arms full,
You dissolve;
“Booboobooboobooboobooooo.”

Sometimes, instead of “Mama!”
You try “Booboo?”
My sense, that milk is all I am to you,
manifest.

Then you call “Booboo!”
When you mean “Weewee!”
And I know it simply
Drips from your lips.

As natural as breathing;
Oxygen in/ “Booboo” out.
Sung through the day
Hummed in the night.

Our own home’s cuckoo;
Your heart-burst for Booboo.

breastfeeding poetry

(Despite having written poetry since being able to scrawl letters, I’ve only one other time shared a poem with others and that was moons ago. So yeah, yikes. There it was.

My Grandad Harry, who is ninety, is a prolific poet, writing several verses every single day. He has had books of his beautiful poetry published and each Monday he shares a new poem on Facebook. How cool is that?

I’m not imagining emulating my Grandad, but when poet Natalie Goldberg wrote that writing doesn’t exist until it’s been heard or read, I felt that if I was going to give in to the urge of writing poetry then I must give fully to it, and hit publish every now and then.)

And now, I’d love your help

As I finished this poem I wondered about all the other milk-crys out there and thought I might like to make an anthology of them.

Ramona loves to hear the story of her own word, BAPS! (Always yelled.) She asks how I knew she meant Mama Milk and I tell her how it was always accompanied by her extending her arms, pumping her hands like she was milking a cow, and then climbing on to my lap and stuffing her head down the neck of my jumper.

What have your little ones called breastfeeding? Is there a story about it? If you don’t mind me sharing it on this blog, please do leave a comment with your own kiddo’s milk-cry.

Thank you!

Activism, Featured, Parenting

Parenting for Social Justice: Non Violent Communication

16 February, 2015

This post goes out to a legend of our time who sadly passed away last week. Marshall Rosenberg dedicated his life to peace and created tools that resolved conflict in the most tricky of situations. I read his book, Non Violent Communication, and became sure that if everyone read it, and put it into practice, the world would be a much more harmonious, beautiful, just place.

I felt it had massive potential for use in the home, that the principles and methods of talking and listening could transform parent- child relationships, that it could restore connection where a disconnect had taken place.

So, I want to kick off a short blog series, Parenting for Social Justice, with Non Violent Communication. (NVC, because life’s too short.)

Who jake change begins at home- here's how

Not because I am amazing at it (I am pretty sure my beg, every early morning, “Let me sleeeeeeeeeep moooooooore because otherwise I will diiiiiieeeeeee” flouts all the NVC guidelines) but because I TRY to bring this kind of communication in my life, and I believe it is KEY in raising social justice loving children.

NVC is a strategy for communicating, but it can also be a lens through which we see life. The four components are observations, feelings, needs and requests.

First, we observe what is actually happening in a situation: what are we observing others saying or doing that is either enriching or not enriching our life? The trick is to be able to articulate this observation without introducing any judgment or evaluation—to simply say what people are doing that we either like or don’t like. Next, we state how we feel when we observe this action: are we hurt, scared, joyful, amused, irritated? And thirdly, we say what needs of ours are connected to the feelings we have identified. An awareness of these three components is present when we use NVC to clearly and honestly express how we are.

For example, a mother might express these three pieces to her teenage son by saying, “Felix, when I see two balls of soiled socks under the coffee table and another three next to the TV, I feel irritated because I am needing more order in the rooms that we share in common.” She would follow immediately with the fourth component—a very specific request: “Would you be willing to put your socks in your room or in the washing machine?”

This picture shows how we can phrase what is going on for us using the four components- it is from a really helpful slideshow on NVC here.

NVC FOR PARENTING You can possibly also see how with small children, this could be a bit heavy, and you will need to be sensitive to that, and never, ever use the revealing of your feelings as a tool for manipulation.

NVC holds an awful lot of insight that I think is especially helpful for parents (well, like, on top of The Whole Thing):

Connection is the key to peace

It is the reason, the how, the why, the everything. Rosenberg is adamant that human connection is the way to unlock violent or angry situations. As parents our number one goal for each day should be connecting with our children. NVC shows us how to keep those doors of connection open no matter what.

The world needs more Empathy

“Empathy is a respectful understanding of what others are experiencing. We often have a strong urge to give advice or reassurance and to explain our own position or feeling. Empathy, however, calls upon us to empty our mind and listen to others with our whole being.”
NVC is a process that gets us into an empathetic place- it has been successfully used to nurture understanding in situations from warring street gangs to international conflict. When we parent with understanding and empathy we are likely to see our children showing understanding and empathy- things the world needs in order to prevent warring gangs and international conflict. The pathway to world peace begins in every home. (What’s good enough for the Gangs of New York is good enough for my Tribe in a Yurt.)

Our needs as parents are real

I love that NVC is about being real. Our feelings are valid and not to be hidden, and yet, yet, it asks us to take a breath and recognise what lies beneath our feelings and how we can actually get what we need. Sometimes I get the impression that attachment parenting relishes martyrdom…. The fact is, if the intense sacrifice of parenting a baby stretches into the toddler and older child years we are denying the importance of our own needs.

The world needs more Self Empathy

And therefore Rosenberg doesn’t just talk of giving empathy to others, but of receiving empathy. We can not keep being empathetic to our children if we aren’t getting dosed up ourselves. We need to find support people to top us up, but mostly we need to be empathetic to ourselves. Being kind to ourselves is one of the most important foundations for empathetic parenting. Funnily enough, I think it is the thing we struggle most with. We experience guilt piled upon guilt and give ourselves a break NEVER. Dive into self empathy, your children will love you for it!

Non violent communication for parents

Being a judgey judger doesn’t help us connect

Importantly, it asks us to not judge our children when they do things we find difficult. We asked constantly to put judgements on our kids- are they good, bad, naughty? And it is hard sometimes to take our judgemental specs off.

We have actually been working with an NVC trained mediator recently and she inspired me with the idea that there is very little “good” or “bad” in day to day situations…. What there IS are people with basic needs trying to get them met in a way that we don’t really like! Never is this more apparent with children. Most of the time children are just expressing a need – for connection or belonging or security- with a strategy that really grates! “MUM I DO NOT WANT YOUR DISGUSTING PASTA FOR TEA!!”

Non Violent Communication in Parenting

What a change of perspective when we can see that our children are just working out the best ways of getting their needs met- and that we are able to have a sincere, kind discussion with them about this.

Non Violent communication in parenting

We need to find alternatives to R ewards and punishments

If there is anyone I going to listen to about how to avoid big, global conflict it is a dude who has dedicated his life to resolving it. Rosenberg says “Punishment is the root of all violence on the planet”and he isn’t referring just to institutional punishment but punitive measures taken in the home- smacking and shaming and bribing. He advocates more connection based, more empathetic ways of communicating with our children- only when children experience empathy will they be able to give it. When children act out of fear of punishment, or in order to receive a reward, they are not acting from the heart, which lessens the good will and peace in the world.

Here is Rosenberg with his dad hat on, using NVC in one of those really tricky situations (that I know too well) when your child hits another:
In such situations, I recommend first empathizing with the child who is behaving violently. For example, if I saw a child hit someone after being called a name, I might empathize, “I’m sensing that you’re feeling angry because you’d like to be treated with more respect.” If I guessed correctly, and the child acknowledges this to be true, I would then continue by expressing my own feelings, needs, and requests in the situation without insinuating blame: “I’m feeling sad because I want us to find ways to get respect that don’t turn people into enemies. I’d like you to tell me if you’d be willing to explore with me some other ways to get the respect you’re wanting.

Take a deep breath

And then, to finish, I think NVC holds one very practical tip that I reckon could be the big change from a volatile parent-child relationship to a peaceful one, and that is: taking a big deep, reflective breath before we react or reply.

Parenting can trigger an emotional response in us- sometimes my child’s behaviour unleashes a small, angry dragon in my belly. If I react from that dragon place out come the bribes and warnings and manipulation. But if I take a moment to understand my feelings, to empathise, to listen, then my fiery breath is much less fierce, and stinky.

NVC conversations are slow and quiet, they involve silent space, reflection and observation. Have a look at this Youtube video to get a sense of how softly, softly these parenting chats can go.

Non violent communication for parents

So there we have it, boom shack, a little overview of how NVC can work in the home. NVC has bought about so much peace worldwide- I believe if it is implemented between adults and children the impact will be multiplied a google times.

Parenting for Social Justice series

You know, I have an undergrad and post grad degree in social policy, and spent the majority of my career in policy and campaigns- determined that this was the way to a fair world.

Then I had children. I began to see that social justice begins in the home; that peaceful adult- child interaction has just as much a role as the UN, the NGOs, all the Nobel Peace Prize nominees. I will raise warring tyrants or peacemakers (or somewhere in between!) depending on how I treat my children.

This series has been on my mind for a year- I want to take a look at how common themes and concepts within the global social justice movement apply to childhood.

I’d love to explore this with you, if you have any ideas we can look at, it’d be awesome to hear from you.

A just and beautiful world is nurtured every time a child is loved and respected….