Featured, Parenting, unschooling

How to start an Outdoor Play Group

12 June, 2015

I stuck my head out of our door to call the kids in for tea a few days ago. Ramona and Juno and our neighbours had been playing on the 6 foot high mud pile outside our house so I was expecting a bit of dirty wreckage…. I wasn’t expecting one of the boys to pop out of the sludgey mountain completely and utterly covered, from scalp to toe. The whites of his eyes shone out of this thick, black, magnificent dirt. They were playing mud ninjas, so, y’know… obviously. It was all I could do not to collapse in a hilarious heap. It was exhilarating to see someone so abandoned and wild and free.

And I was a weencey bit glad he was walking the 50 metres home to his own bath…

One of the things I have loved the most in our last 15 months living in New Zealand has been this sense of being nestled right amongst the mud and trees and birds. Whenever we are feeling a bit down we can just open the door and pick some fruit or climb a tree (time outdoors is one of the five best keys to happiness and we have really experienced that) and the girls are developing a whole education in the natural world. Ramona surprises me almost daily with little observations she has made about the animals that surround us, and then there’s Juno who mostly speaks Animal, with 3 or 4 perfect bird calls under her belt… amidst a tiny human vocab.

“‘Is the spring coming?’ he said. ‘What is it like?’ …
‘It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine, and things pushing up and working under the earth.’”

—Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

Early last year a few of us got together and began an Outdoor Play Group – a group of parents and children that simply play in nature. It is pretty much the one thing in our week that we are committed to, every Tuesday we spend from 10-2 at our friends little slice of wilderness. It is a hugely important part of our lives, where the girls can play uninhibitedly and where I get the chance to be nurtured by time and conversation with other parents. I’ve written before about the many, many reasons to get outdoors and play in the wild. 

Here is a little video I made today about our own outdoor Play Group, Nature Space:

(It looks quite wholesome, I know, and it sort of was, with a lot of chatter about penises and poo muted out!)

I thought I’d put some ideas out there, that might help parents set up their own Outdoor Play Group. Here are 8 steps for setting up an Outdoor Play group – follow these and you could have your own group in a matter of weeks!How to set up an outdoor play group amongst nature

Check that an official Nature Play doesn’t already exist close by

Firstly check there isn’t an official Nature Play Group already in your area – you could be one of the lucky devils able to jump on board with one already rolling. Clare Caro (she is an inspiration) has developed an organisation that is leading a well supported movement of Outdoor Play groups in the UK, under the banner Nature Play. Double check this list to make sure you don’t already have one near you. If you do, find out how to get involved through Clare’s web site.

Find a team
Find two friends who are interested too. I watched a video a few years ago that has stuck with me ever since. It is about how the first guy that jumps up to dance will stay just a loner until a couple of other dancers join him – then a movement begins. (Watch it here. It’ll make you smile!) This goes for beginning pretty much anything and everything. You alone are FANTASTIC but you need two friends to build momentum. Once there are three of you, you are good to go!

  • Ask around your friendship group – you might be surprised who will commit to this with you. It is my experience that almost all parents are looking for ways to be more outdoors with their children.
  • Post on local Facebook groups or community forums- your two buddies might not be known to you yet! “Want to get outdoors with your children more? Let’s begin a regular meet up for parents and children! Looking for two team members, please call.”
  • Ask wider Facebook groups to help you with your search – the Attachment Parenting and like minded groups admins might be able to help, as an example.
  • Go offline- put little notices up in the library and at local Tots groups.

“Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.”

—John Muir, Our National Parks

Have an open meeting
Draw on your whole community to give your Outdoor Play Group a good boost right at the start. Get people (parents, La Leche group organisers, wise people, elders, any stakeholders)  in a room to share your vision. Advertise this open meeting widely. This is a great way to pool resources, discover fresh ideas about location, and you could well end up with a list of contacts that might form your first attendees.

Location (public)
Scout for a location. The UK and New Zealand are fortunate to have lots of little woods and reserves dotted around the place, or failing that little pockets of “nature areas” within parks. Ideally you will have a little grove of trees, with a small clearing amongst it, enough space to really roam and feel a little isolated from the busyness of a city, enough peace to be able to spot birds. We are lucky to have a little stream running through our area which makes for a great amount of fun in winter and summer. A tiny pond would also be great – as would, even, a tree-less beach. Is it free from buildings and human-made structures? It’s a winner. Even if it’s a public place, being in touch with the council about your plans could be really valuable.

Location (private)
If you don’t have anywhere public try thinking about private spaces. There are privates gardens, or backyards of neighbours or stretches of land owned by trusts… get together with your team mates and start getting in touch with people.  I am sure you will be surprised how many private land owners would be delighted to step in and help provide a beautiful space for your group.

Get grounded in the principles of Outdoor Play
How hard can it be, right? Walk outside, play in the nature. Sort of. I like to think that there are some foundations for really free and beautiful parent-child time spent outdoors though. These include allowing play to be totally child – led. Giving space for children to work through challenges, and conflict. Clare has given a lot of thought to this and I massively recommend being inspired by these Nature Play Guidelines together. We introduced ukelele playing at our own Outdoor play group as a way for the adults to have fun, and to give the children more space to explore autonomously. We were finding that idle parents can spend too much time focusing on their children and almost interrupting their play.

Sort out the deets
Find a day and a time that suits your core team. We do Tuesday 10 – 2/3pm because we all make lunch and eat together. The official London South East Nature Play group do 10-12 on a Thursday. Figure out the slot that will suit you three, trying not to overlap with another local group that parents might attend,  and then let others arrange their timetable around you.

Promote it
Nothing’s really stopping you now, apart from other families joining you! Start a Facebook group and start inviting people to it, visit local tots groups and make an announcement at the end of each group, put flyers up around local venues. It can take 6 months to a year for a group like this to really build up. If there are three families committed to this you will be able to ride this bumpy first stage, as people come and go and get a feel for it. Soon enough you will be maxed out!

Hooray! Here’s to your own mud bath, river paddling, weed ripping, fire toasting Outdoor Play group!

“These people have learned not from books, but in the fields, in the wood, on the river bank. Their teachers have been the birds themselves, when they sang to them, the sun when it left a glow of crimson behind it at setting, the very trees, and wild herbs.”

―Anton Chekhov, “A Day in the Country”

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13 Comments

  • Reply ThaliaKR 12 June, 2015 at 11:44 pm

    Well this is very inspiring, and also empowering.

    I’ve started step one tonight!
    ThaliaKR recently posted…How to rest (do you need to learn?)My Profile

  • Reply Emma 13 June, 2015 at 1:33 am

    Wow, so prescient! I’ve been thinking a lot about this. I’m lucky enough to live somewhere with both a Steiner and forest playgroup already, but both are pointed at older children (my baby is very much a baby, not a toddler) so I was wondering about the potential of gathering a few like minded friends and just letting our babies roll around in / eat the grass. Which we are currently doing alone in our garden, but it would be lovely to do it out on the moors. We could even change location every week…
    Emma recently posted…We’re On The Changing MatMy Profile

    • Lucy
      Reply Lucy 13 June, 2015 at 8:41 am

      Oh yah- do it!

  • Reply Mammasaurus 17 June, 2015 at 7:47 pm

    So inspiring Lucy – I love the video and the ethos behind it. There’s no Nature Play Groups near to us at all, and being in the middle of the New Forest it seems silly not to look in to starting one. We have done ‘Afterschool Club’ in the past, which is just a collecting the kids from school and heading straight out into the forest for exploring and nature play – something I must do more of. Much love Lucy – I love everything about this x
    Mammasaurus recently posted…Monastery of Tsambika (Tsampika) , RhodesMy Profile

  • Reply Jenny Paulin 17 June, 2015 at 10:34 pm

    some really fab ideas here, thanks x
    Jenny Paulin recently posted…Picnic Tips for National Picnic Week, 2015 with HiggidyMy Profile

  • Reply Otilia 17 June, 2015 at 11:36 pm

    Playing outdoors is always better than indoors! Maybe I should start an outdoor group in my area too.
    Otilia recently posted…Glorious Chocolate CupcakesMy Profile

  • Reply Michelle Twin Mum 18 June, 2015 at 6:31 am

    What a greta post Lucy, so informative and a really nice idea, none of mine have ever gone to an outside playgroup. Mich x
    Michelle Twin Mum recently posted…Feeling Confident at Nighttime with DryNites® Pyjama PantsMy Profile

  • Reply Emma 19 June, 2015 at 7:02 am

    Ooooh, I love this idea Lucy! I’m wondering how I could adapt for slightly older children. After school outdoor club??
    Emma recently posted…Why visit Florida?My Profile

    • Lucy
      Reply Lucy 24 June, 2015 at 3:21 am

      Oh yeah definitely! This involves lots of homeschool families too, so kids of all ages.

  • Reply Cass@frugalfamily 19 June, 2015 at 8:35 am

    What an amazing idea – children love nothing more than playing outside x x
    Cass@frugalfamily recently posted…Homemade lavender and oats bath soak….My Profile

  • Reply 5 ways to help your child fall in love with nature | The Natural Parent Opinion 28 October, 2015 at 2:59 pm

    […] Build time in nature into your weekly rhythm. Hold a Sunday picnic, plan playdates at the bush, start an outdoor playgroup. Liberate yourselves from walls and see how the rhythms of nature can bring balance to your […]

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